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ThisLaserProcedurePromisesBigBenefitsforGumDiseaseTreatment

Over the years, dentists have become quite proficient in treating even the most severe periodontal (gum) disease. Many of these positive outcomes are achieved through manual effort using simple hand instruments called scalars and conventional periodontal surgery.

But that might be changing soon: Periodontists (specialists who care for the gums and other supporting dental structures) are starting to use a different kind of tool for gum disease treatment—surgical lasers.

Although lasers are more commonplace in other fields of medicine, recent developments hint at a more prominent future role for them in dentistry. One of these developments is a laser procedure called Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP®) that treats deep spaces of infection called periodontal pockets, which develop advanced gum disease.

These pockets form as infected gums gradually detach from a tooth as the supporting bone is lost. This widens the normally narrow gap between the teeth and gums. The ensuing pocket fills with infection that must be removed to adequately treat the gum disease. As the pocket extends down to the root, it's often necessary to perform a surgical procedure through the adjacent gum tissue to fully access it.

But with the LANAP® procedure, the dentist can use a laser to access a deep pocket without opening the gums. Moving from above into the gap between the tooth and gums, the light from the laser has the ability to remove diseased tissue without damaging healthy tissue.

The dentist follows this with ultrasonic equipment and manual scalers to further decontaminate the tooth root surface. The laser is then employed once again to facilitate the formation of a blood clot between the teeth and gums to seal the area with a fibrin clot. Once treated, the dentist will monitor the tooth to ensure maximum bone regeneration and gum reattachment.

Although outcomes are the same for the most part, this laser technique for periodontal pockets may have some advantages over conventional surgery. Studies so far show that LANAP® causes less tissue removal and bleeding, less potential for gum recession and less discomfort experienced by patients.

It's not likely that lasers will fully replace conventional gum disease treatments any time soon. But if the encouraging evidence thus far continues, the laser will one day become as commonplace alongside the other tools used for gum disease treatment.

If you would like more information on treatments for gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treating Gum Disease With Lasers.”

ReplaceYourTeethinStagesWiththeHelpofDentalImplants

Complete tooth loss is a common condition among older adults, gradually occurring one or two teeth at a time. There often comes a point of realization, though, that all the teeth will eventually be lost.

This can create a dilemma: Do you replace teeth as they're lost, or go ahead and have all of them removed at one time?

Up until recently, the latter choice seemed the most practical and affordable. But most dentists would agree that keeping natural teeth for as long as practical is better for a person's overall oral health and to slow any potential bone loss.

The emergence of dental implants has made this less of a dilemma: We can use this technology to more affordably replace teeth in stages rather than all at once. This is because an implant is technically a root replacement: a dentist inserts a titanium metal post into the jawbone. Because of an affinity with titanium, bone cells grow and adhere to the implant surface, which creates a stronger hold. It also impedes bone loss.

We can, of course, use implants as individual tooth replacements. But the expense of this approach with multiple teeth puts it well out of reach financially for many people. But implants can also be used as connective points between the patient's jaw and other kinds of dental restorations like bridges, partial dentures, and full removable or fixed dentures.

Using this approach, we can adopt a strategy of allowing healthier teeth to remain until it's necessary to remove them. We initially place implants to support a bridge, for example; later we can use the same implants along with additional ones to support a larger restoration, even a fixed full denture.

An implant-supported restoration is typically more expensive than traditional bridges or dentures, but far less than replacing teeth with individual implants. And because the stages of restorations may occur over a long period of time, the cost can be spread out to make it more manageable.

If you're facing a future where it's likely you'll lose all your teeth, you don't have to lose them all at once. Staged restorations with implants could help you hold on to your natural teeth for as long as possible, slow bone loss and make for a healthier mouth.

If you would like more information on the wide array of dental restoration options, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Replacing All Teeth But Not All at Once.”

WhatChrissyTeigensInaugurationNightCapMishapCouldMeanForYou

Inauguration night is usually a lavish, Washington, D.C., affair with hundreds attending inaugural balls throughout the city. And when you're an A-List celebrity whose husband is a headliner at one of the events, it's sure to be a memorable night. As it was for super model Chrissy Teigen—but for a slightly different reason. During the festivities in January, Teigen lost a tooth.

Actually, it was a crown, but once she told a Twitter follower that she loved it “like he was a real tooth.” The incident happened while she was snacking on a Fruit Roll-Up (those sticky devils!), and for a while there, husband and performer John Legend had to yield center stage to the forlorn cap.

But here's something to consider: If not for the roll-up (and Teigen's tweets on the accident) all of us except Teigen, her dentist and her inner circle, would never have known she had a capped tooth. That's because today's porcelain crowns are altogether life-like. You don't have to sacrifice appearance to protect a tooth, especially one that's visible when you smile (in the “Smile Zone”).

It wasn't always like that. Although there have been tooth-colored materials for decades, they weren't as durable as the crown of choice for most of the 20th Century, one made of metal. But while gold or silver crowns held up well against the daily grind of biting forces, their metallic appearance was anything but tooth-like.

Later, dentists developed a hybrid of sorts—a metal crown fused within a tooth-colored porcelain shell. These PFM (porcelain-fused-to-metal) crowns offered both strength and a life-like appearance. They were so effective on both counts that PFMs were the most widely used crowns by dentists until the early 2000s.

But PFMs today make up only 40% of currently placed crowns, down from a high of 83% in 2005. What dethroned them? The all-ceramic porcelain crown—but composed of different materials from years past. Today's all-ceramic crowns are made of more durable materials like lithium disilicate or zirconium oxide (the strongest known porcelain) that make them nearly as strong as metal or PFM crowns.

What's more, coupled with advanced techniques to produce them, all-ceramic crowns are incredibly life-like. You may still need a traditional crown on a back tooth where biting forces are much higher and visibility isn't an issue. But for a tooth in the “Smile Zone”, an all-ceramic crown is more than suitable.

If you need a new crown (hopefully not by way of a sticky snack) or you want to upgrade your existing dental work, see us for a complete exam. A modern all-ceramic crown can protect your tooth and enhance your smile.

If you would like more information about crowns or other kinds of dental work, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By PETRA I MAYER DDS
May 14, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

Are you interested in getting dental implants?

Missing teeth were never something that you thought you would have to deal with and yet, a surprising number of adults, even young adults, face this problem. The good news is that dental technology has come a long way over the years, making it possible for your Albuquerque, NM, periodontist, Dr. Petra Mayer, to provide patients with dental implants, the next best thing to real teeth.

What are dental implants?

An implant is a popular solution for replacing missing teeth because they are permanent and lifelong. Plus, they have the look and feel of a real tooth. A small titanium screw or post, which takes the place of the missing tooth roots, is inserted into the jawbone. Over the course of several months, the jawbone and gums grow around the screw, implanting it permanently into the jawbone. Once this occurs, the artificial tooth is then fitted over the screw to complete your new tooth.

Why dental implants?

This procedure is a wonderful way for your Albuquerque, NM, periodontist to replace missing teeth, restore smiles, and improve oral health. Implants provide our patients with a new attitude, appearance, and confidence because this restoration is truly the closest you can get to a real tooth.

While the goal is always to preserve your own natural smile, the truth is, there are millions of Americans missing teeth and they need a trustworthy and lifelong solution. Dental implants offer them that.

Some of the benefits of dental implants include:

  • You don’t have to worry about cavities because implants are made from synthetic material
  • They won’t move or shift around in your mouth, they will stay firmly in place like natural teeth
  • They are easy to keep clean, just simply brush and floss them like you would your natural teeth
  • They stimulate the jawbone to produce new bone cells, which keeps the jawbone healthy and strong
  • They fill gaps in your smile to prevent the rest of your teeth from drifting into these gaps
  • They fully restore your bite, so you can eat what you want without concern

If you are interested in sitting down with your Albuquerque, NM, periodontist, Dr. Mayer, to discuss dental implants, then call our practice today at (505) 881-2400 to schedule a consultation. Your new smile is just a call away.

By Petra I Mayer DDS
May 11, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: aging  
KnowingHowtheMouthandFaceGrowCanImproveBiteTreatment

Correcting a bite problem involves more than applying braces. Orthodontists must consider a wide range of factors, including the type of bite problem involved, complications like impacted or missing teeth, and their patient's overall dental condition.

Orthodontists must also keep in mind the future—how will a treatment implemented now impact a patient's appearance and dental function many years from now? In reality, orthodontists perform these treatments within a dynamic growth environment, especially involving children and teenagers whose mouth and facial structures are still maturing.

And although these growth changes slow in adulthood, they don't stop—orofacial structures continue to change throughout life. For example, a person's lips steadily thicken in size until the mid-teen years, and then slowly thin out over the rest of their lifetime. The distance between the lips both at rest and while smiling may also narrow in later years. Other changes continue to occur in the bones and soft tissues of the mouth and face.

Fortunately, this structural growth follows a fairly consistent track. Although variations do occur, an orthodontist can project the growth changes their patients will undergo as they age, and use that knowledge to plan out bite treatment. With this understanding, orthodontists plan not only what treatments will be needed, but when to perform them, and to what extent.

This may involve a number of treatment stages, spaced out to coincide with regular development. An orthodontist may focus first on general bite correction to bring the teeth and jaws into a reasonable state of alignment. Later, they'll use more refined methods to fine-tune corrections that better align with later adult growth.

More intensive treatments may be necessary to build a foundation for future treatment. For example, orthognathic surgery may be needed to correct a severe case of an over-extended lower jaw. During the procedure, surgeons move the lower jaw to a joint position higher on the skull. This retracts the lower jaw into a more normal alignment with the upper jaw, and can dramatically change the facial profile for the better.

Each orthodontic patient is different, and each requires their own a unique treatment plan. That plan has a greater chance of long-term success by applying knowledge of future growth changes.

If you would like more information on orthodontic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Understanding Aging Makes Beauty Timeless.”





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