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Posts for: August, 2019

OralHygieneMightBeontheDeclineWiththeNewestAdultGeneration

The Millennials, those born around the turn of the Millennium in 2000, are entering adulthood. Like any generation, they have their collective promise—and problems. An example of the latter seems to involve their teeth: an estimated one in three people between the ages of 18 and 34 have some form of tooth decay.

If a recent survey is correct, that may be a result of poor oral hygiene practices. The absence of a consistent, daily habit of brushing and flossing to remove disease-causing dental plaque is the number one cause for dental disease. But a survey of 2,000 millennials found only three in ten brushed their teeth at least once a day with many often skipping brushing for two or more days a time.

Interestingly, more than half of the survey also reported an aversion to dental visits. That will likely need to change if these trends in poor hygiene continue, as aging millennials will eventually need extensive treatment for tooth decay and its close counterpart periodontal (gum) disease to save their teeth. Dental professionals recommend a different dental care track: stop dental disease before it develops. And the key to that is a simple but powerful daily brushing and flossing routine.

This routine should involve brushing teeth up to twice and flossing at least once a day. Brushing should be done with gentle strokes, but include all exposed tooth surfaces (about two minutes to perform a thorough job). Flossing is less popular than brushing, but it’s essential for removing plaque between teeth your brush can’t reach. To make it easier, you can use pre-threaded floss or a water flosser that removes plaque with a stream of water.

To round out your prevention strategy, you should see a dentist at least twice a year for professional cleanings of hardened plaque deposits (calculus), as well as overall monitoring of your dental health. And if dental visits make you anxious, your dental professional has a number of ways to help you relax.

One thing’s for sure: like any other generation, millennials prize both good health and an attractive smile. Adopting a solid oral hygiene lifestyle will do the most to achieve both.

If you would like more information on practicing effective oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Petra I Mayer DDS
August 22, 2019
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: dental implants  

If you have lost one or more teeth, your best replacement solution is the dental implant, for this treatment option offers unmatched stability, longevity, and aesthetic appeal. Here at our Albuquerque office, your dentist, Dr. Petra Mayer, places and restores dental implants to give patients fully restored smiles—read on to learn more!

Dental Implants from our Albuquerque Office

These titanium implants reside in the jaw, naturally adhering to and fusing with the bone (a process called osseointegration). In fact, the more a dental implant is used, the more resilient the bond becomes because of this phenomenon.

When osseointegration is complete, Dr. Mayer attaches a metal extension post and customized porcelain crown to the implant. This step finishes the restoration, allowing patients to enjoy decades of excellent biting, chewing, and of course, smiling.

Besides replacing single teeth, your dentist can use dental implants to support multi-tooth bridges and dentures. All of these appendages improve jaw bone quality and size, but unlike conventional partial or full dentures, implant prosthetics do not slip or require adhesives/support from adjoining teeth.

Should you choose dental implants?

The American Academy of Implant Dentistry says that about three million Americans have dental implants, and these artificial teeth could be right for you, too!

To find out, arrange a dental implant consultation with Dr. Mayer. She'll examine your teeth, gums, and bone structure to see if your oral health is optimal and if you have enough bone in your jaw to support the implant device. If the bone is thin, don't fret—Dr. Mayer can build it up with donor bone or other augmentation materials.

Caring for dental implants

If you're concerned that caring for dental implants is complicated, think again. Implant patients simply brush twice a day, floss once daily, and receive semi-annual check-ups and hygienic cleanings with Dr. Petra. People who grind their teeth are encouraged to wear acrylic bite guards, and smokers should quit their tobacco habit, as cigarettes can cause an infection in the implant sites.

Learn more

Call Dr. Mayer's Albuquerque office team today at (505) 881-2400 to set-up a dental implant consultation. She'll answer all your questions about these amazing restorations.


NeilPatrickHarrisWhattheOscarsHostTreasuresMost

A few days before the Oscars, Vanity Fair magazine asked Academy Awards host Neil Patrick Harris to name his most treasured possession. Was it his Tony award statuette for best leading actor in a musical? His star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame? The stethoscope he wore while playing teenaged doctor Doogie Howser on TV? No, as it turns out, the 41-year-old actor’s most treasured possession is… his wisdom teeth. Yes, you read that correctly. “Oddly, I still have my four wisdom teeth,” Harris said. “I refuse to let them go or I’ll lose my wise parts.”

How odd is it for a 41-year-old to have wisdom teeth? Actually, not that odd at all. While it is true that wisdom teeth are often removed, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to this. It all depends on whether they are causing problems now, or are likely to cause problems in the future.

The trouble wisdom teeth cause is related to the fact that they are the last molars to come in, and that molars are large in size. By the time wisdom teeth appear between the ages of 17 and 21, there often is not enough room for them in the jaw. Sometimes it’s because you may have inherited a jaw size that’s too small for your tooth size; and generally speaking, the size of the human jaw has evolved to become smaller over time.

If room is lacking, the adjacent molar (that came in earlier) can interfere with the path of eruption — causing the wisdom tooth to come in at an odd angle. The wisdom tooth can hit up against that other tooth, possibly causing pain or damaging the adjacent tooth. This is known as “impaction.” Sometimes the wisdom tooth breaks only partway through the gum tissue, leaving a space beneath the gum line that’s almost impossible to clean, causing infection. A serious oral infection can jeopardize the survival of teeth, and even spread to other parts of the body.

If a wisdom tooth is impacted, will you know it? Not necessarily. A tooth can be impacted without causing pain. But we can see the position of your wisdom teeth on a dental x-ray and help you make an informed decision as to whether they should stay or go. If removal is the best course of action, rest assured that this procedure is completely routine and that your comfort and safety is our highest priority. If there is no great risk to keeping them, as Neil Patrick Harris has done, we can simply continue to monitor their condition at your regular dental checkups. It will be particularly important to make sure you are reaching those teeth with your brush and floss, and that you keep to your schedule of regular professional cleanings at the dental office. All healthy teeth are indeed worth treasuring.

If you would like more information about wisdom teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Wisdom Teeth” and “Removing Wisdom Teeth.”


By Petra I Mayer DDS
August 06, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
SeeYourDentistifYouHaveoneoftheseTop3OralProblems

For years people tuned in to enjoy one of David Letterman's "Top 10 lists," a frequent gag performed on his show Late Night. Each countdown list poked fun at off-the-wall topics like "Top 10 New York City Science Projects" or "Top 10 Questions People Ask when Shopping for an Umbrella."

Recently, the American Dental Association presented their own kind of list—"America's Top 3 Oral Health Problems"—based on surveys of around 15,000 people across the U.S. But unlike the popular Late Night lists, this one is no laughing matter.

Coming in at #3, 29% of the respondents indicated they had experienced tooth pain at some time in their life. Tooth pain is the body's way of alerting to trouble in the mouth, anything from a decayed tooth to a gum abscess. The best thing to do if you have any persistent oral pain is to see your dentist as soon as possible for a thorough examination. And you should do this even if the pain goes away.

The second most prominent oral problem among people is difficulty biting or chewing, about 31% of those in the surveys. As with tooth pain, the reasons can vary greatly, including cracked, loose or deeply decayed teeth, dentures or jaw joint disorders (TMD). Because dental disease is usually the ultimate culprit, the best way to avoid this is to practice daily brushing and flossing and regular dental visits. And, as with tooth pain, you should see your dentist if you're having symptoms.

At 33% of respondents, the number one oral problem in America is chronic dry mouth. It's a constant inadequate flow of saliva often caused by medications or certain systemic conditions. Because saliva helps protect the mouth against infection, a restricted flow increases your risk of disease. If you notice your mouth is dry all the time, you should talk to your dentist about ways to boost your saliva. If you're taking medications, ask your doctor if they could be causing your symptoms and if you could change to something else.

While any of these Top 3 oral problems can be a stepping stone to more serious dental problems, it doesn't necessarily have to lead to that. You can improve your dental health through daily oral hygiene and regular dental treatment. And it might help you stay off this unpleasant list.

If you would like more information on treating dental disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Top 3 Oral Health Problems.”